Sculpture commemorates slavery abolition

The Freedom! sculpture, commemorating the end of the slave trade in the U.K. 200 years ago and made from recycled material by young Haitian people and Haitian sculptors, goes on display today at Liverpool’s Maritime Museum today, Feb. 26th. Commissioned by National Museums Liverpool and the charity Christian Aid, the sculpture will tour London and Bristol before returning as a permanent display in Liverpool’s new International Slavery Museum (PDF format), set to open on Aug. 23rd.  Haiti became the first black republic following the first successful slave revolt. Still, the sculpture is aimed at reflecting on existing inequalities in global trade and the need for a fairer deal for developing countries, not just the abolition of the slave trade, according to a Christian Aid press release posted on the Reuters Foundation website. The Reuters Foundation was founded in 1982 to support journalists from developing countries, and today embraces a range of educational, environmental and humanitarian projects and causes. David Fleming, Director of National Museums Liverpool, said on the Christian Aid press release: “This remarkable sculpture is an important work of art in its own right, but it also symbolizes the links between the historic transatlantic slave trade and contemporary issues of freedom, enslavement and global inequalities.” Roland Cadet, one of the young Haitian collaborators on the project, also said on the press release: “People don’t have chains on their arms and legs now, but people still have chains in their minds. When you have problems getting enough food, housing and education, you are not living in a free country.”  Liverpool’s new slavery museum will be in the former Dock Traffic Office on Liverpool’s waterfront. The government last month presented the development with a £500,000 capital grant, following up on the pledge of £250,000 of annual revenue funding from the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, and a £1.65 million grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund awarded last September. The launch date for the new centre is aimed to cooincide with the UNESCO International Day for Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition.

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One Response to “Sculpture commemorates slavery abolition”

  1. haitian art for sale Says:

    When you have problems getting enough food, housing and education, you are not living in a free country.” Liverpool’s new slavery museum will be in the former Dock Traffic Office on Liverpool’s waterfront.

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